Polybase installation on SQL Server 2017 part I- Oracle JRE 7 Update 51 (64-bit) or higher is required

Fresh new year, so a good time to check out the newest SQL Server! So far the installing process itself in SQL server 2017 brings no big new surprises. Just like the SQL Server 2016, you have to optionally download and install the SSMS via the Microsoft website, the link will be provided once the installation has finished.

SQL Server 2017

Next the install en configuration starts. I’ll highlight the one pain in the ass I encountered this time.

I already talked about the Polybase feature related to the content in a podcast early 2016, but this time an install and setup walkthrough, plus a warning for all the people bravely installing oracles newest version of java.

When you select the Polybase to be installed and you payed close attention, or already used it in 2016 edition, you know that you need the oracle SE Java Runtime Environment.Polybase Oracle JRE

If this is not already installed on you’re computer, the installation will fail, resulting in this message :


You need to head over to oracle.com and install a 7.51 or higher version, currently 9.0.1 is the highest, so seems legit to install this one.

Java install






Once you downloaded the correct product, In my case I choose the Windows Offline. Now run the Java install and return to your SQL Server setup for a re-run.

Wait what? Same message! “Requires JRE 7 update 51 or higher”. I just installed the latest JRE version, did a restart and java is up and running.

So, this it the moment you ask yourself, do I really really want the polybase feature that bad? The anwser is Yes! To start the troubleshoot, I decided, to do some backward compatibility, the oldest version available from site, without using my oracle client registration is 8.151, and guess what…This did the trick!

So stay away from the newest 9 version for as long as possible.

Next post will be the setup and configuration of the polybase



Creating a linked server ´MySQL to MSSQL´(query the MySQL database without openquery function)

In addition to my previous linked server tutorials, I decided it is time to add MySQL to the linked server series.
In order to have the bug tracking application, Mantis migrated from linux and have it run on a windows environment, I wanted to create a replication between SQL2008 and MySQL, but then I thought, why not try out a virtual linked server again first, to test Mantis isntallation on a Windows based installation, since the online promise of Mantis on a MSSQl environment is not very promising. So today we will create a linked server from MySQl to MSSQL on a windows 2008R 64 bit environment.

Create DNS for MySQL

In order to do so, We first need to install the correct drivers in order to create a ODBC DSN, Just download the drivers from Mysql developers site http://dev.mysql.com/downloads/connector/odbc/ and install them to your database server. DriversIf we see the listed drivers, it means we can create a new DSN, so open up the System DSN tab and ADD a new DSN, you must fill in the correct credentials, for example:ODBC_Connector

Data Source Name: Enter a describing name, so you can see what it does, you might have more linked servers or other connectors running on the same server.
Description: this isnt maditory, but if you want to be more specific, be my guest.
Server: in my case,it’s localhost, as this is a test server and MSSQL and MySQl are on the same server.
Insert username and password, when this is done. The database will display the possible databases you can connect to, in the dropdown.

Click OK and as you can see the System DSN has been added to ODBC.

Create new Linked Server

When this is done, it’s time to open up the MSSQl server and add a new linked server to the Server Objects.4_create_LInkedsname your linked server, I give it the same name as the SystemDSN. And choose the correct provider: Microsoft OLE DB Provider for ODBC Drivers. and datasource equels DSN name.
You need to fill in all the credentials for the provider string, for example:

DRIVER=(MySQL ODBC 5.2 ANSI Driver);SERVER=localhost;PORT=3306;DATABASE=mantisbt; USER=user;PASSWORD=password;OPTION=3;

Note: meaning of OPTION=3 in the MySQL connection string:
Option=1 FLAG_FIELD_LENGHT: Do not Optimize Column Width
Option=2 FLAG_FOUND_ROWS: Return matching rows
Option=3 option 1 and 2 together

Now click OK, this is always the most fun part to me! when it says connection tot the linked server succeeded!

In addition to this, you can enable provider options on the SQLOLEDB, In my case I select the Dynamic Parameter and Allow inprocess.

Now, lets run the test and see if it connects with the databases, as you can see, it connects all the databases available on the MySQL server.

Connection test

But, most important, we can query it directly. Wheeee!

Linked server without OpenQuery function (Tip!)

Maybe you have read other MySQL linked server tutorials before this one and found out that you could only query the mysql database using the openquery() function or maybe that IS  the reason it brought you to this site. Extra, as in extra work, is never fun! With the correct ODBC driver and the right provider options, you can query the MySQl database, just like any other MSSQL database on your MSSQL server. Just follow the tutorial above and don’t forget to  enable the correct provider options. Cheers!