SQL2016 Stretch database. Yes, it’s another linked server

Your manager always wants to keep all the data…now with bigdata being a thing and algoritmes are used more efficient (IOT), people want to hoard data even more, but it needs to be online to be valuable. If you have to restore the data first, your data is not very valuable. But all this extra data also slows down your database performance…and gives the dba’ers extra challenges….but not anymore.! Well, at least when your boss got a big wallet and don’t mind spending it on a SQL buget.

In SQL2016 Microsoft introduced the stretch database. which give you live access to ‘archived’ data and makes it feel like it’s on premise. And  it’s a secretly just a linked server! A linked server between mssql and Azure.LS+azure

How does this work, and is it safe?

Yes! since it works on secure linked server technology and it stores an encryption key on the on-premises sqlserver, it’s suitable for all your cold data, not hot, because it does slow down the query speed, but it will not clogg your network and your data will be available at all times, even when the data is being stretched over to Azure the data still is fully query-able.

First ask yourself, Do you really need to keep this data? If yes, How do you create a stretchdatabase? Well, this is easy!

Hesitations? use this link for info on the MS Stretch database advisor.

I use a simple test database, the adventureworks2016 ctp3.

Before we can start, check if the data archive function is enabled, if not (0) enable it.

Next we can create a master key to encrypt all your data locally, this way, the data can’t be read in Azure.
Note: You can also create a masterkey from the stretchdb wizard, it’s up to you. I’ll show both options.

Next I will create a simple table  and populate it with some data, to keep the demo quick and simple :

Keep your Azure account ready! I use the SQL logical server resource, you need to create a resource before you can stretch the database.

Azure resource

 

Select the table you will be stretching to Azure. Now enable the table for stretching and the wizard will open up.

Enable stretch database

It’s a Hybride archive – You can stretch the whole table or filter out the (c)old data from a massive table.
4_EnableStretchTable

 

Next thing you create a master key, if you didn’t make it before, if you made it already, It will ask you to fill in the master password.Masterkey_StretchTable
10_LoginStretchTable

Fill in the IP range for a firewall rule.IP_Azure

12_EnableStretchTable

Hey Ho, let’s go, that was easy!

Now the table will start to stretch, if you want to see if it stretched yet, try a select query and check the executionplan.
14_EnableStretchTable

Want your data back? No problem, You can bring back the data to your on-premise server, if you don’t want to use Azure. Because, when you delete your azure account, the data will be gone too!

bringbackmydatabringbackmydata2bringbackmydata3

 

Note: Data storage can be expensive on Azure, but this function gives us a positive view on the ever growing databases and it’s possibilities.

Query a database through a C# REST API with Powershell (part 1)

It is probably known that you can query an SQL database in Powershell relatively easy, but wouldn’t it be great to quickly write a REST API in front of the database? So that you can add business logic if you wish? And use Powershell as a REST client? And then be able to code a decent frontend for the API for whatever device?

Let’s get started!
In this series I will first create a WebApi from scratch. Of course, you can also use the templates in Visual Studio, but I prefer to have a bit of knowledge of the code that’s in my project. It’s not that hard and you will end up with a clean code base.

Step 1. Get your dev environment ready

You can use a Vagrant box. If you use this Vagrantfile a install.ps1 script will be copied to your desktop. Run it, grab a coffee or go shopping because we are on Windows and Windows apps can be huge.

Step 2. Getting the VS Project in place

Start Visual Studio
Create a new empty solution:

ice_screenshot_20160508-093224

I named the empty solution BusinessApp (I’m lacking inspiration for a better name).

Then right click the newly made solution in the Solution Explorer (the pane on the right) and click Add and the New Project:

20150508-context

 

 

 

 

 

I named the new Project BusinessApp.Api. If you set your solution up like this you can add more projects as you continue extending the app, for example for an Angular (or whatever framework) frontend, or if you want to separate your datalayer. You can also put your Powershell client modules in a separate project if you wish.

Then open up the Nuget Package Manager Console and install the WebApi dll’s:

Make sure to choose the correct Package source (Microsoft and .NET).

Step 3. Add routing

Add a new folder and name it App_Start.
Create a new class in the folder and name it WebApiConfig.cs

In this class we configure that we want our api to return and consume json. Also, we configure our routes to match the controller name, followed by id, wich is optional. E.g http://example.com/api/employees/1 would match a controllername Employees, and it would return employee with id 1.

Step 4. Enable CORS

We need to enable CORS else we won’t be able to consume the api from from another domain outside the domain from which the resource originated. In a production web environment you should configure this very carefully. I will CORS very permissive because I want my code to work.

Install CORS with in Nuget console:

Then modify the WebApiConfig.cs class as follows:

Step 5. Add a Controller

  • Create a folder named ‘Controllers’
  • Right click the Controllers folder and click Add and then Controller
  • Click Web API 2 Controller with read/write actions.

ice_screenshot_20160508-092302

I named the Controller Test Controller.

Step 5. Add a Global.asax file

We need to add a Global.asax file to call the WebApiConfig.cs methods at startup.

Right click the solution, click Add, click New Item and search for Global.asax, then Add it.

ice_screenshot_20160508-095951

Modify Global.asax (see the highlighted lines):

 

Step 6. Test the API

Hit F5 and browse to http://localhost:/api/test

ice_screenshot_20160508-100831

And it works. You can also consume the API with Powershell at this point:

It should return value1 and value2.

Done! Now let’s query a database. This will be explained in Part 2.